Is facelift tape for real?

I'm just learning about facelift tape for the first time and, not surprisingly, I am very excited at this prospect. I have so many questions but first and foremost I'm curious to know what cosmetic surgeons think about the product--especially with respect to its actual effectiveness. In plain language, is facelift tape a total scam?

LisaLewis

F, 54, Kentucky

There's no magic to facelift tape. It's a non-surgical "instant face lift" solution that has been available for at least 50 years. In the past, face lift tape was used by theatrical makeup artists, but today "lift kits" are available for consumer use from specialty stores and online from Amazon or Ebay.

While there are a few different variations, most of them work along the same lines: Two transparent, stick-on hooks are adhered with a special glue to either side of the face -- usually in front of the ears. A piece of string or transparent cord like a fishing line is then attached to each hook and connects behind the head. When the string is tightened, it literally stretches the face towards the back of the head.

This type of apparatus does offer a slight smoothing effect and can be beneficial for the contour of the jawline. If pulled too tightly, however, face lift tape can distort the facial features and look unnatural.

Needless to say -- it's not a real face lift, and if things go wrong the whole setup can turn rather embarrassing. The tape strips also aren’t completely invisible and depending on how you style your hair, they can often be spotted. On the other hand, instant face lift tape can be applied and removed very quickly, so there’s no harm in giving it a try.

I can't say that I recommend face lift tape and I think its lack of popularity speaks for itself. In my opinion, it works best when worn for a brief period or when posing for a photograph. It’s probably not the best choice for a night on the town.

If you're interested in non-surgical approaches to reducing the visible effects of aging, I suggest you contact a board-certified dermatologist or plastic surgeon to discuss dermal fillers and other non-invasive cosmetic treatments.

Dr. Michael Law has 3 Facelift before & afters:

Facelift before image performed by Dr. Michael LawFacelift after image performed by Dr. Michael LawFacelift before image performed by Dr. Michael LawFacelift after image performed by Dr. Michael LawFacelift before image performed by Dr. Michael LawFacelift after image performed by Dr. Michael Law

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Instant face, neck and eye lift tapes are DIY products that provide a temporary lifting effect. You can buy them at many beauty and skin care retailers or online at Amazon or Ebay. To answer your question, no, they are not scams. But they're also not nearly as effective as a face lift, mini face lift or any of the excellent non-surgical options available today.

It's understandable to be concerned about cosmetic surgery results and to want a "no commitment" face lift alternative. Rather than sticking tape to your face and tying it behind your head with string, I recommend you instead start researching temporary dermal fillers, Botox, laser treatments, or any of the many options available to you today.

Face and neck lift tapes are decades-old, mechanical solutions to fine lines, wrinkles and sagging facial skin. If you're curious about these kits, there's no reason not to give them a try.

But if you're interested in longer lasting treatments to reduce wrinkles, improve skin tone and reduce the signs of aging, I recommend that you pursue a professional clinical solution.

Always remember to consult with a board-certified plastic surgeon for best results.

Face lift tape is a simple consumer product available for home use. These kits offer a mechanical approach to stretching facial skin. They do work but can be very unreliable. The sticky pads are often visible and can lose their stickiness over time.

Face lift tape typically has three components: Two adhesive tape strips which stick to the skin next to your ears and one piece of string which connects to each piece of facetape. The string connects behind the head, and when it's pulled tightly it literally stretches the facial skin towards the back of the head.

Does it work? Yes, although it's important to manage expectations. The effects are most visible on the lower face, jawline and neck. The problem with most of these instant face and neck lift systems is that they tend to look unnatural. You have to be careful how tight you pull the skin back. Pull too much, and it's easy to distort your face or the shape of your mouth. You also have to worry about the adhesive tape coming off and the effect instantly disappearing. (If this happens during a conversation, it can be a bit of a disaster.)

Face lift tape is a very old product. Today we have much better non-invasive, non-surgical procedures to reduce wrinkles, improve the jawline and plump up the lips. If your interest in old solutions like face lift tape and neck lifting bands is because you’re hoping to avoid surgery, there are much better options available.

I suggest you visit a board-certified plastic surgeon to discuss simple, non-surgical facelift alternatives that don't involve tying strings around your head.

No, face lift tape isn't a "scam", but it's also not a particularly effective product. If it were, you'd hear about it more often. Face lift tape is a simple beauty product which uses a string to stretch the facial skin. After attaching adhesive 'hooks' next to your ears, a string is attached to each hook and tied behind the head. As the string is tightened, the skin stretches backwards, providing a face lifting effect.

While that may sound like a great start, there are a number of common issues with these instant face lift kits. For one, the adhesive tape strips may not last all night. Even though the tape sticks quite firmly at first, once it comes off the effect vanishes and so does your "facelift". Another problem is that you'll need a hairstyle that covers the obvious sticky hooks which are stuck next to your ears.

Face lift kits are inexpensive, easy-to-use products. If you're interested in giving a face lift a trial run they're certainly an easy, inexpensive, zero-risk option. Many patients are understandably reluctant to undergo plastic surgery and it sounds like you might be one of them. If you're looking for cost-effective, non-surgical options to reduce fine lines and wrinkles, I assure you there are many better options available today.

I encourage you to consult with a board-certified plastic surgeon to discuss non-invasive and minimally-invasive options which won't come "unstuck" in the middle of a conversation.

Dr. Brian Machida has 25 Laser/Peel, Facelift before & afters:

Laser/Peel, Facelift before image performed by Dr. Brian MachidaLaser/Peel, Facelift after image performed by Dr. Brian MachidaUpper eyelid lift, Lower eyelid lift, Facelift before image performed by Dr. Brian MachidaUpper eyelid lift, Lower eyelid lift, Facelift after image performed by Dr. Brian MachidaFacelift before image performed by Dr. Brian MachidaFacelift after image performed by Dr. Brian MachidaFacelift before image performed by Dr. Brian MachidaFacelift after image performed by Dr. Brian Machida

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It probably helps for some women! Give it a shot! It is obviously a short term and uncomfortable solution.

Dr. Jonathan Zelken has 4 Facelift, Necklift before & afters:

Facelift, Necklift before image performed by Dr. Jonathan ZelkenFacelift, Necklift after image performed by Dr. Jonathan ZelkenFacelift, Necklift before image performed by Dr. Jonathan ZelkenFacelift, Necklift after image performed by Dr. Jonathan ZelkenFacelift, Necklift before image performed by Dr. Jonathan ZelkenFacelift, Necklift after image performed by Dr. Jonathan ZelkenFacelift, Necklift before image performed by Dr. Jonathan ZelkenFacelift, Necklift after image performed by Dr. Jonathan Zelken

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