Rhinoplasty and Chin Implant Surgery Review. Before and After Photos to Prove It Was A Great Decision!

Tags: man age 18-24 nose chin jawline nasal bump silicone implants consultation multiple procedures painless swollen permanent non surgical anesthesia

PatriotsKing
$12,500
Overall procedure rating

Practice & Staff

  • 5 -
    Ease of scheduling an appointment
  • 5 -
    Office environment, cleanliness, comfort...
  • 5 -
    Staff friendliness and courteousness

Overall experience with the procedures

  • 5 -
    Level of trust in provider's decisions
  • 5 -
    How well provider explained procedure(s)
  • 5 -
    How well provider listens to and answers questions
  • 5 -
    Amount of time provider spent with you

Procedure specific satisfaction rating

Chin implant

Performed 2012

Zwivel Rating
(5/5)

I was 19 years old when I finally decided to visit a plastic surgeon about my nose and chin. Growing up, I had always been teased about my large nose. I had a bump, medically known as a dorsal hump, on my nose and kids can be cruel. My parents asked their friends in medicine for a recommendation to a good doctor. One of their friends who is a dermatologist recommended Dr. Jon Hall, a board-certified plastic surgeon in Boston, Massachusetts. I live just outside Boston and decided to schedule a consultation with him to see what could be done about my nose.

At my consultation, Dr. Hall seemed to be a very down to earth, likable guy. After telling him my concerns, he examined my nose and then asked if I had ever considered a chin implant. He pointed out to me that one of the reasons my nose may have seemed bigger than it actually was, is because I had a weak chin. He told me the tip of your chin should align roughly with the part of your nose that connects to your forehead. He said that a chin augmentation could be done through a small incision at the bottom of my chin or inside my mouth. Through the incision, he would insert a small silicone implant that would enhance the projection of my jawline. When I asked him what held the implant in place, he said the body would naturally form a pocket around it after some time and this would secure it in place . He also told me rasping down my dorsal hump would give me the nose I wanted. After taking some before pictures and showing me some simulated after photos and being assured I was a good candidate for both procedures, I was ready to go home with a lot to think about. I thanked Dr. Hall for his time and told him he would be hearing from me in the near future.

Once I got home, I started researching rhinoplasty (nose job) and chin implant surgery. Since this was elective surgery, I was in no rush. Although oddly enough, at the time (It's been 9 years since my procedure), I wasn't too scared of having a surgical procedure. (If I was to have this done now, I think I would have been a lot more nervous.) As I researched chin implants, a learned about different types of facial implants: silicone and Gore-Tex. Both seemed to be safe and effective, so I was ok with Dr. Hall's choice to go with silicone. During my research, I did come across an alternative to using facial implants to augment my chin, but it looked like a far bigger procedure. Some patients had their chin bone broken and moved forward using metal rods. This appeared to be for people with severe overbites, where their lower jaw was greatly receded. All of the reviews with photos of patients who had this surgery showed what looked like a rough recovery. All of them had a lot of bruising and swelling post-op, and they couldn't eat solid food for almost two months! For me, this seemed like too big of a procedure for a relatively small defect, that I was never too concerned about. Dr. Hall was right, a simple implant would do!

After mulling things over for a few months, I decided to call Dr. Hall's office and schedule my surgery. The procedure was to cost $12,500, all in, including the surgeon's fee, anesthesia, post-op care following surgery, etc. The procedure was to be done at an outpatient surgical center, which is a common plastic to perform elective plastic surgery procedures. Since I was only 19, fortunately I didn't have to worry about taking off from work. My surgery was planned for the summer.

As my surgery date approached, I had to have blood work done to make sure I was healthy and ready for surgery. Since I was young and healthy, I didn't need to have a full physical, heart tests, or anything.

The day of my procedure I arrived at the surgery center early in the morning. I filled out some forms and was then called into a surgical prep area. I was given a gown to change into. After that, Dr. Hall came in, spoke to me and looked at my nose and chin. He confirmed again that we were both on the same page about what I wanted. After that, I was given an IV and wheeled into the operating room. At that point, I don't remember much. I remember speaking with the anesthesiologist and then he put a white substance into my IV. After that, I passed out and woke up in the recovery room with bandages on my nose in chin.

Once I was awake, I remember not being in any pain at all, but I was extremely thirsty. There was a nurse in the room and I asked her if I could have water. She said no, but offered what can only be described as a flavored cotton-ball. It definitely did not help with my thirst, but I knew I'd live. I also found it a bit difficult to speak, as I could feel in the implant inside my mouth.

After lying there for another 30 minutes or so, Dr. Hall came back in and said everything went great and that I needed to be careful not to bang my nose or chin for the next few weeks. It was then time to go home.

As my parents came to take me home, I remember feeling super embarrassed that I had bandages on my nose and chin. I looked like a monster! My parents pulled their car up and home we went.

My recovery was not easy. It wasn't painful, but I did not want to leave the house. I was very swollen and did not want to be seen by anyone. After a few days or so, I had my follow-up appointment and now it was time to see if my rhinoplasty and chin augmentation surgery were worth it. When I arrived at Dr. Hall's office, he asked how everything was going. I told him that I did not have any issues and was anxious to see my face. He handed me a mirror and slowly began to undo the bandages on my nose (my chin bandage was already coming off). As Dr. Hall began to remove the packing in my nostrils and the gauze over my nose, I began to get excited. I could already tell my nose no longer had the bump! I stared at my face for a while and while I was happy my bump was gone, my nose looked fat. Dr. Hall assured me this would improve as my recovery time went on. He said it could take up to a year for all of my swelling to away.

Over the next few months, things improved greatly. I returned to working out regularly and my swelling continued to diminish. I also began to not feel my chin implant, as my body got used to it. As the year went on, I began to really like my new face. It's now been years since my procedure, I could not be happier. Although the changes to my face are small, it made a huge difference in my self-esteem. I am now confident with my entire face and I'm thankful I went with Dr. Hall's suggestion to have my chin enhancement. It really gives my face symmetry and makes me look better.

Overall, I would highly recommend having a rhinoplasty and chin implant surgery if you're self-conscious about these areas of your face. For me, it was well worth it. Good luck and please make sure you get personal recommendations to great plastic surgeon. I've heard horror stories from people who went to bad surgeons and were mutilated. I can't stress this enough! Please make sure you doctor is certified by the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, American Board of Plastic Surgery or the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Also ask to see plenty of before and after photos! You want a doctor with a lot of experience with the exact procedure you plan on getting.

Update: Since my procedure, I've learned that fillers can be used for non-surgical chin augmentation. If you're considering this, I would still recommend going with a surgical chin implant procedure. My chin implant surgery was very easy to recover from and it's permanent. If you have a chin augmentation with fillers, you'll need to go back to the doctor every year, will spend a fortune, and your chin will probably look different each time, as it'll depend on the skills of the person injecting it.

 


Dr. Jon Hall

Boston, MA