What fillers are used for a liquid midface lift?

Tags:woman midface cheekbones lift volume loss juvederm

I want to address the loss of fullness in my cheekbone area, but I don't think surgery is necessary yet. I've done some research and discovered that liquid midface lifts are supposed to do just that: restore full high cheeks. I just need to know which fillers are best for this type of treatment. I've read about about Perlane and Juvederm Voluma, but I have no idea which one I should try. Please share your experience.

keystrucking

F, 38, New Jersey

I'm just 38, but I'm already starting to see the effects of aging in my cheeks. My once full-looking face now has a sunken appearance because I've lost a significant amount of volume in my cheeks. My doctor suggested that instead of a facelift, I consider a filler treatment. I agreed, as I didn't want to undergo an invasive facial plastic surgery procedure. My doctor uses dermal fillers like Radiesse, Restylane, Juvederm Ultra, Juvederm Ultra Plus, and Perlane. Sometimes these fillers get combined with Botox.

Each filler has their unique characteristics. My doctor decided to use Sculptra. Sculptra lasts about two years and helps to create collagen in your skin. Using Sculptra gave me lasting results that lifted my cheeks and still allowed me to keep a natural look. The type of filler used for your procedure will depend on the results you want and the doctor you use. I was happy with the results that I got using Sculptra and it's been a little over a year since I had the injections.

I am very familiar with cheek fillers because I have been getting treatments for the past four and a half years. I first got Botox to get rid of my sagging skin, but I didn't like the end result because it left my skin very droopy and saggy. Let’s just say that I got a new facial plastic surgeon and now I get cheek fillers on a regular basis. One thing that is important to know is there is not a one-time fixer upper solution available. All liquid filler options require touch ups but some last longer than others. Usually the first liquid injection is more expensive than the follow up ones. My favorite filler is Radiesse because it is calcium based and lasts for about a year. In the past I used Juvedorm but its made of hyaluronic acid which I did not know at the time, but now know irritated my skin really badly. Fat fillers only last for about a month, so I don't recommend them to anyone. Sculptra is acid based like Juvedorm and encourages your body to create its own collagen like Radiesse does. The treatments range from $600 to $1000, but get cheaper if you get multiple treatments.

I'm glad that you asked about this. I just successfully completed my first Juvederm liquid facelift 6 months ago. This is after years of a terrible amount of stress caring for aging parents, and facing a string of toxic relationships, dealing with divorce and death in the family. Needless to say, that I looked horrible from the stress, the lack of sleep, and taking poor care of myself in general. When I finally got out of the woods, I wanted to do something for myself that might help boost my self-esteem and confidence. A quick fix, until I could get my health back on track. Specifically, I wanted to address my sunken temples and sagging hollow cheeks. I'm happy to say that the treatments did just that! There was redness and swelling for long enough to kind of get me down and make me not want to go out, but that was to be expected. It went away within the period that my doc had said it would. In the meantime, I used ice packs and caught up on rest.

I was interested in a having a liquid lift. Apparently, liquid facelifts are not really facelifts. It's really a procedure that applies fillers to certain areas of the face. It does correct issues with facial volume and fix some issues caused by gravity. Over the years, I lost a lot of fullness in my cheeks and had some fine lines and wrinkles that I wasn't happy about. I wanted to have a fuller, more youthful appearance. However, I didn't want to undergo an invasive procedure. I was told that several fillers are used to create a fuller and less wrinkled look.

Voluma, Juvederm, Belotero, Botox, Restylane, and other types of soft tissue fillers are used. Some physicians might also consider using face injections. Plastic surgeons might also combine the drugs. My doctor and I decided to use Voluma. I decided on Voluma because it's such a long-lasting facial filler (it can last 2 years).

I was very happy with my results. Of course, the skill level of the surgeon who performs your cosmetic procedure will have an effect on the quality of the results. So, it's important that your physician has experience with liquid facelifts.

There are a few different liquid facelift options that can be used for a midface lift, most work better than botox that paralyzes facial muscles. Most liquid fillers act like a sponge, and absorb fluid to inflate cheek pads. Juvederm Voluma, $600 per injection, is one of the most popular liquid fillers. Refills are usually required around the six month mark to sustain results. Perlane costs about $700 and is another type of filler is made from hyaluronic acid which can be used for cheek lifts and lips. This type of filler lasts about nine months. Sculptra costs about $800, and adds volume to flattened areas. It is made of Poly-L-Lactic acid. The substance encourages the growth of new collagen in your face. For some patients the results last up to two years. Lastly, Radiesse a $700 filler, is a calcium based substance that also stimulates the formation of new collagen. These fillers lasts about a year in some cases.

From what I've heard, most of the fillers have essentially the same look when injected in cheeks, but the difference seems to be that Voluma is a little more long lasting than other dermal fillers. I actually ended up not using any synthetic fillers for my mid face lift. Instead, my plastic surgeon recommended that I go with a micro fat grafting procedure instead. This involved removing some fat from my lower body and injecting it into my cheeks. It took a little longer than just injecting a filler, but they said it was more likely to be permanent instead of fading away like a filler. I also like that there's no risk of an allergic reaction, since I tend to be sensitive to synthetics. It's been over nine months, and I've had no volume loss in my cheeks instead of beginning to sink like I've seen happen with some other types of fillers.